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Old 07-10-2018, 12:22 AM   #26
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I think what Leon said was key - if you collect what you like then it doesn't matter. I collect low-grade 50's to 80's baseball and hockey - building sets for the 48 to 79 Bowman and Topps run.

I enjoy it and couldn't care less what they're worth so if the value tanks then it's not a concern. If it was for investment purposes it would be a different story but then I don't think I'd enjoy it as much.
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Old 07-10-2018, 02:59 PM   #27
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One of my best memories in childhood is reading the biography of Babe Ruth. I assume this is still offered in many children's libraries so if they are getting second hand knowledge that way, I don't need my grandfather to tell me stories (which he still did of seeing his favorite player, Ted Williams) about Ruth to get me interested in the myth and legend that surrounds him. As long as the sport remains in the top 2-3 that people like, which itself is beginning to become debatable, then people will want to collect the stars of yesteryear.

I'll be happy if the known vintage players increase in value at a steady 2-3% to stave off inflation over the next couple of decades. I'm attempting to invest long term but only to diversify my portfolio and not go more than 10% into collectibles. The obvious goal is to have around a million in retirement for those entering after 2050 so if you've got $100k tied up in sports cards, you damn well better hope there is still a market down the road, heh heh.
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Old 08-05-2018, 02:41 PM   #28
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This is such a hard question to answer imo lol big help I am - It's just kinda scary how it's become a sea of flippers out there though that's for sure - Buy what you like, like what you buy! #PRODUCTSTODAYAREALLTHESAMETOME
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Old 08-08-2018, 08:43 PM   #29
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It's funny at the National I saw a lot of 53 T Mantles and 51 Bowman Mantles in dealer's cases that were full of modern chrome rookies.

I think it shows that not just vintage dealers are seeing the value in vintage and are trying to flip vintage RC's/hot vintage cards.

As far as value goes, baseball is such a part of American history that grew as our nation did. In popular culture, some of the best movies and books have baseball as its subject. I just cant see all that going to zero.

In the end content, rarity and condition are the keys to future value. Having the best condition cards, of the most popular players in their rarest issue will increase in value the most.
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Old 08-08-2018, 08:52 PM   #30
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Migration to quality vintage will be the key as vintage cards are not rare and when many of the largest collectors pass on the overall vintage supply will continue to increase.

If you think about the overall vintage market have overall prices increase ANY from 1993?
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Old 08-08-2018, 08:58 PM   #31
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I think ICONIC players (Ruth, Mantle, Cobb, Aaron, Williams ..etc) will always stand the test... However, I believe a lot of the GREATS will get lost (people like Yogi, Musial, Bench)
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Old 08-08-2018, 10:04 PM   #32
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Migration to quality vintage will be the key as vintage cards are not rare and when many of the largest collectors pass on the overall vintage supply will continue to increase.

If you think about the overall vintage market have overall prices increase ANY from 1993?
Yes, big time for HOF RC's, Mantles, Ruth's, Cobb's etc.
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Old 09-03-2018, 07:15 PM   #33
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Yes, Vintage will continue to hold value. There is TOO much new stuff now, and there is artificial scarcity, with numbered and short printed cards that are 1 of 1, 1 of 10 etc.

The vintage stuff is simply what survived. And it will continue to appreciate in value.

Just my $.02
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Old 09-03-2018, 09:21 PM   #34
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Yes, Vintage will continue to hold value. There is TOO much new stuff now, and there is artificial scarcity, with numbered and short printed cards that are 1 of 1, 1 of 10 etc.

The vintage stuff is simply what survived. And it will continue to appreciate in value.

Just my $.02
Agree with this, I have recently switched to vintage and sold off most of my modern. Also, something about holding a key vintage rc in your hand, its a piece of history and art, with a story behind it. Much more fulfilling than collecting modern in my opinion, I see myself only liking vintage more and more as I keep buying it.
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Old 09-03-2018, 10:21 PM   #35
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I see more and more people jumping into the vintage side of things. I don't think its going anywhere.
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Old 09-03-2018, 11:25 PM   #36
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I see more and more people jumping into the vintage side of things. I don't think its going anywhere.
I can attest to this

I fell out of new stuff and into vintage earlier this year got tired of felling like I was flushing my $$ down the toilet. And my only regret is I didn't do it sooner.
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Old 09-04-2018, 12:33 AM   #37
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I can attest to this

I fell out of new stuff and into vintage earlier this year got tired of felling like I was flushing my $$ down the toilet. And my only regret is I didn't do it sooner.
Hey buddy! Long time no talk lol.


Newer stuff = flooded market.

That usually tends to steer collectors into the other direction and that direction is "vintage" stuff.
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Old 09-04-2018, 12:45 AM   #38
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I have thought about this same question for quite a while and I feel fairly confident that HOF vintage will defiantly gain value at probably at an even greater rate in the future. First of all I think that with the rich getting richer I could see in the future some billionaires buying large percentages of the high grade vintage of certain players increasing their rarity. Besides that I feel that even if collecting stops that people will always look at vintage baseball especially as a way to make money and as people have mentioned earlier if their is money to be made people will go for it. I could totally see in 40 years from now some article coming out about all of these hipsters getting rich investing in vintage baseball. I also think that the concern of kids not being interested in collecting is true and false at the same time. I feel that as children teens and young adults in general have much shorter attention spans they tend to gravitate towards technology, but I don’t think this means they will never collect. I truly believe that the youth of today will start to get into cole ring in their 30s and 40s. As the saying goes you turn into your parents. For example people have always thought that there wouldn’t be that many people with grandfather clocks in the future but they are still here. Essentially for examples sake lea say that when you are 70 you want a grandfather clock and you die at 80. For those 10 years everyone would say that when that generation does no will want grandfather clocks, but in that 10 year span there would be more people entering their 70s than to begin with. The only difference between that hypothetical example and cards is that right now we are entering the gap years. All the people old enough to be into collecting cards have been part of the “original wave” and so people say once that wave dies out collwcting is done. We are just waiting for the people young enough to have missed out on the original wave to grow old enough to get interested in cards injecting more demand into the hobby and raising card values.
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Old 09-06-2018, 08:46 AM   #39
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Collecting vintage is overrated. Everyone needs to collect the new shiny stuff. Here is a pack of cards (there were 20 in it) that got ripped some time ago, just not by me.
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Old 09-06-2018, 09:05 AM   #40
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Originally Posted by GoldPanner View Post
I have thought about this same question for quite a while and I feel fairly confident that HOF vintage will defiantly gain value at probably at an even greater rate in the future. First of all I think that with the rich getting richer I could see in the future some billionaires buying large percentages of the high grade vintage of certain players increasing their rarity. Besides that I feel that even if collecting stops that people will always look at vintage baseball especially as a way to make money and as people have mentioned earlier if their is money to be made people will go for it. I could totally see in 40 years from now some article coming out about all of these hipsters getting rich investing in vintage baseball. I also think that the concern of kids not being interested in collecting is true and false at the same time. I feel that as children teens and young adults in general have much shorter attention spans they tend to gravitate towards technology, but I don’t think this means they will never collect. I truly believe that the youth of today will start to get into cole ring in their 30s and 40s. As the saying goes you turn into your parents. For example people have always thought that there wouldn’t be that many people with grandfather clocks in the future but they are still here. Essentially for examples sake lea say that when you are 70 you want a grandfather clock and you die at 80. For those 10 years everyone would say that when that generation does no will want grandfather clocks, but in that 10 year span there would be more people entering their 70s than to begin with. The only difference between that hypothetical example and cards is that right now we are entering the gap years. All the people old enough to be into collecting cards have been part of the “original wave” and so people say once that wave dies out collwcting is done. We are just waiting for the people young enough to have missed out on the original wave to grow old enough to get interested in cards injecting more demand into the hobby and raising card values.
I can see hipsters investing but I dunno about the kids part. I don't see kids really being into sports like they use to be. This past little league season I was surprised to hear how many kids has no interest in playing baseball and we're only there because their parents made them. A 10 year old had an Angels hat, Trout shirt and spikes, I asked him if he goes to Oakland to see Trout. He said no baseball sucks, I only like watching basketball. I was stunneddddddd at 10, baseball was life when I was 10. I think baseball truly does need to make baseball more appealing to kids despite what 50 year old fans think.

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Old 09-06-2018, 04:59 PM   #41
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I can see hipsters investing but I dunno about the kids part. I don't see kids really being into sports like they use to be. This past little league season I was surprised to hear how many kids has no interest in playing baseball and we're only there because their parents made them. A 10 year old had an Angels hat, Trout shirt and spikes, I asked him if he goes to Oakland to see Trout. He said no baseball sucks, I only like watching basketball. I was stunneddddddd at 10, baseball was life when I was 10. I think baseball truly does need to make baseball more appealing to kids despite what 50 year old fans think.

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Sadly, most of the professional sports fans are trending to an older demographic. Baseball is the worst though. The newer generations will be watching e-sports just as much as real life sports. I wonder when Panini will release its first e-sports fortnite set.
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Old 09-08-2018, 09:34 PM   #42
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Sadly, most of the professional sports fans are trending to an older demographic. Baseball is the worst though. The newer generations will be watching e-sports just as much as real life sports. I wonder when Panini will release its first e-sports fortnite set.
Yep, this is a trend but as all things evolve, I think the youth sports themselves are the issue.

At very early ages, players are asked to play year round and choose one sport to specialize in.

Parents are encouraged to hire personal coaches and shop their kids to the best teams available.

Kids just wanting to play for fun have no chance making travel teams (good teams), are stuck on club or non-travel teams that are not competitve or teach the game much or even practice.

So to be good at baseball requires thousands of dollars in investment and a huge investment in time by players and parents, which in a lot cases burns out the players and they end up quitting before high school.

We used to have sports where anybody could play but now it is elitist.

Those little league world series teams are great stories but if you actually asked the parents how much time and money it cost to get their kids there it would shock many people.
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Old 09-09-2018, 01:06 PM   #43
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Yep, this is a trend but as all things evolve, I think the youth sports themselves are the issue.

At very early ages, players are asked to play year round and choose one sport to specialize in.

Parents are encouraged to hire personal coaches and shop their kids to the best teams available.

Kids just wanting to play for fun have no chance making travel teams (good teams), are stuck on club or non-travel teams that are not competitve or teach the game much or even practice.

So to be good at baseball requires thousands of dollars in investment and a huge investment in time by players and parents, which in a lot cases burns out the players and they end up quitting before high school.

We used to have sports where anybody could play but now it is elitist.

Those little league world series teams are great stories but if you actually asked the parents how much time and money it cost to get their kids there it would shock many people.
There was a HBO real sports segment on how big the high school travel team industry is now. The numbers were staggering. The piece focused on a mega huge complex opening in Ohio.
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